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Style of High Mountains and Long Rivers - National Art Museum of China Landscape Painting Exhibition

By OGP Reporters / Members Contribute File Photos

Oh Good Party

Taste it, comprehend its meaning, and comply with its intent. Instead of focusing on the object's reality, it emphasises the subjective reality that lies behind it. An essential aspect of Chinese landscape painting is the saying, "Mountains and rivers make me speak for the mountains and rivers."

A selection of top-notch Chinese landscape paintings from recent years are on display in "High Mountains and Long Rivers in Shenzhou Style - National Art Museum of China Landscape Painting Exhibition". These paintings range from amazing splashing ink to thick ink and light hues. The details are in place, the brushwork is impeccable, and the artistic notion of the landscape is vibrant with colour. It is truly outstanding from a "technical" standpoint and deserving of audience members' continued acclai


The mountains and rivers of China's natural scenery are depicted in Chinese landscape paintings. Landscape paintings are divided into five categories in "Encyclopedia of China Art Volume": blue-green landscape (golden and blue landscape), ink landscape (ink brush landscape), light purple landscape (light colored landscape), small blue-green landscape and boneless landscape.


In landscape painting, there are five different methods: "hook, slap, rub, dye, and point." It is abstract in order to convey the aesthetics and spirituality of the original painter.


Taste it, comprehend its meaning, and comply with its intent. Instead of focusing on the object's reality, it emphasises the subjective reality that lies behind it. An essential aspect of Chinese landscape painting is the saying, "Mountains and rivers make me speak for the mountains and rivers."


Chinese painting has a subset known as landscape painting. Since the Sui Dynasty, landscape paintings have been produced. The terms "Pingyuan," "High Yuan," and "Far-reaching" are emphasised in landscape paintings. Pingyuan is comparable to "walking on the mountainside" while viewing things from a dispersed perspective. The attention shifts frequently while walking. Gaoyuan is like using a parachute to slowly descend from the top of the mountain, and the attention is also shifting. Draw a very long scroll with thousands of kilometres of mountains and rivers. A lengthy scroll can be drawn on a vertical axis from the mountain's summit to its base; for the far-reaching, employ the contrast between the outlines of the far and nearby mountains to create a stereoscopic, deep valley effect.


The scenery of mountains and rivers appeared as an additional scene for figure painting throughout the Wei, Jin, Southern, and Northern Dynasties, when landscape painting and figure painting were not entirely separated. Chinese landscape paintings are distinguished by the requirement that someone or a structure be depicted in order for the picture to convey emotion.


However, landscape painting increasingly diverged in the Sui and Tang dynasties. The earliest landscape painting still extant is "Spring Tour" by Zhan Ziqian from the Sui dynasty. Landscape painting developed more throughout the Five Dynasties and Northern Song Dynasties, and it also developed its own autonomous, systematic aesthetic theory.


Chinese landscape painting started to be split into the south and the north schools during the Tang Dynasty.


Li Sixun, the inventor of the big axe method of splitting, founded the Northern School. He applies vivid azurite to the thick ink and moss in addition to reusing colours in his works. The Song Dynasty's Zhang Zeduan, Li Tang, Ma Yuan, Xia Gui, and others adopted his fashion and established a group.


The Southern School employed Mi Fu, one of the "Four Schools of the Song Dynasty," who "used more ink and less colour," and Wang Wei, who was recognised for "painting in poetry and poetry in painting," to depict the hills south of the Yangtze River in the drizzle. Later, the practise of drawing landscapes entirely in ink emerged, and artists like Wang Meng and Ni Zan created the Southern School's distinctive aesthetic.


Landscape art slid into formalism from the late Ming Dynasty through the Qing Dynasty. The artist, who was no longer observing nature, began by imitating antiquated painting techniques and haphazardly changed the composition of the painting. Even though there were numerous flower, bird, and figure paintings produced during the Ming and Qing eras, Master, the growth of landscape painting was constrained by the inherent framework of the time and stalled.



Modern landscape painting has at last made a comeback by breaking the boundaries once more. A large number of landscape painters adopted Western painting theories, altered the traditional Chinese landscape painting style, and advanced the genre to a new level. Outstanding painters of landscapes today include Huang Binhong, Li Keran, Zhang Daqian, Fu Baoshi, Guan Shanyue, and other masters of this generation.


The aesthetic expression in many contemporary landscape paintings is also far superior. The mountains and rivers are shown using a unique brush and ink technique, exaggeration and distortion of the image, segmentation, deconstruction, and innovative composition processing. Natural environment In addition, more artists are using a hybrid of modern technology and traditional Chinese painting techniques to portray mountains and rivers, plateaus and deserts, snow-capped mountains and rainforests, urban and rural areas, and even to express more complex social issues and environmental demands through paintings.


Chinese landscape art has an aesthetic like this.



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